Syllabus: Updated on 14 Feb (Week 2) « Histories & Theories of the 18th-C British Novel

Syllabus: Updated 14 Feb (Week 2) « Histories & Theories of the 18th-C British Novel.

Pay attention to Week 3 Onwards\\

Week 3: Pamela’s Worth

Monday:2/22

Pamela: Letter XXIV to End of to End of Volume I (Penguin 98- 279; Oxford 54-219)
Group 1: In-Class Presentation

Letter XXXII – End Vol I (98-219), Vol II stop before Monday Morning Eleven o’clock (p.221-249)

Wednesday: 2/24

Pamela: Start at the beginning of Vol. II (Penguin 280; Oxford 221) and stop before Monday Morning Eleven o’clock (Penguin 285; Oxford 249)

Catherine Ingrassia’s “‘I am Become a Mere Usurer’: Pamela  and Domestic Stock-Jobbing”; AND EITHER Laura J. Rosenthal’s “Pamela’s Work” OR Patricia C. Brückmann’s “Clothes of Pamela’s Own: Shopping at B-Hall”

Group 2: In-Class Presentation

Start at Monday Morning Eleven o’clock to the end of Saturday (249-313);

Week 4: Why Won’t It End? Narrative Form in Pamela

Monday: 2/27

Pamela:

Start at Monday Morning Eleven o’clock (Penguin 286; Oxford 249); Stop  at the end of Ten o’Clock at Night in the Penguin (380);end of Eleven o’Clock Thursday Night in the Oxford (353)

Group 3: In-Class Presentation

Sunday and stop at Wednesday, the Seventh (313-452)

Wednesday: 2/29

Pamela:

Start at Friday Evening (Penguin 380; Oxford 353); Stop right before Tuesday Morning, the Sixth of my Happiness (Penguin 435; Oxford 415)

Group 4: In-Class Presentation

Start at Wednesday the Seventh to End (452-end); Terry Castle’s  ”The Carnivalization of Eighteenth-Century English Narratives”

Week 5: Pamelists and Harlots

Monday: 3/5

Pamela: Start at Tuesday Morning, the Sixth of my Happiness (Penguin 435; Oxford 415) and read to the end

Group 5: In-Class Presentation

Eliza Haywood’s Anti-Pamela (From here on, page assignments will be announced on the blog)

Wednesday: 3/7

Pamela Illustrations: Look for parallels and differences between the Pamela Illustrations and Harlot’s Progress (e.g., overturned tables)

Janet E. Aikins Yount’s “Introduction”  http://www.unh.edu/english/faculty/yount/pamela_illustrations/introduction.html and “Printing History” http://www.unh.edu/english/faculty/yount/pamela_illustrations/printing_history.html

Williams Hogarth’s a Harlot’s Progress: http://www.tate.org.uk/britain/exhibitions/hogarth/modernmorals/harlotsprogress.shtm

Lori Errico-Seaman and Olivera Jokic’s “Frequent Scenes from Pamela“: http://www.umich.edu/~ece/student_projects/pamela_illustrated/scenes.htm and “Eighteenth-Century Illustrated Editions of Pamela”: http://www.umich.edu/~ece/student_projects/pamela_illustrated/ [focus on the 1742 edition and at least one other]

Optional: Heather Carroll’s Analysis of Harlot’s Progress: http://georgianaduchessofdevonshire.blogspot.com/2008/10/harlots-progress-plate-1.html (click “next” at the bottom of the post to view other plates)
Optional: Lori Errico-Seaman and Olivera Jokic’s “Illustration History of Samuel Richardson’s Pamela“: http://www.umich.edu/~ece/student_projects/pamela_illustrated/

Anti-Pamela; Lori Errico-Seaman and Olivera Jokic’s “Illustration History of Samuel Richardson’s Pamela“; Jürgen Habermas’ The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society excerpts

Week 6: Anti-Pamela

Monday: 3/12

Eliza Haywood’s Anti-Pamela: Title Page (Broadview 51) to end of Letter VII (Broadview 190)
Optional: Introduction, Chronology, Notes on British Money by Ingrassia (Broadview 7-50)

Group 1: In-Class Presentation

Charlotte Charke’s A Narrative of the Life of Mrs. Charlotte Charke; Carol Lazzaro-Weis’ “The Female “Bildungsroman”: Calling It into Question”

Wednesday: 3/14

Wednesday:

Group 2: In-Class Presentation

Anti-Pamela: Letter VII (Broadview 190) to end (Broadview 227)

Jürgen Habermas’ The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry into a Category of Bourgeois Society excerpts

A Narrative; Kristina Straub’s “The Guilty Pleasures of Female Theatrical Cross-Dressing and the Autobiography of Charlotte Charke”; Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick’s Epistimology of the Closet excerpts

Spring Recess

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